Effects of trx versus traditional resistance training programs on measures of muscular performance in adults

Issue: Vol. 2, No. 2

Published by Journal of Fitness Research

Tags: Balance , Body Composition , Functional Training , Older Adults , Young Adults

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  1. Jeffrey Janot
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  2. Taylor Heltne
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  3. Chelsea Welles
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  4. Jaime Riedl
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  5. Heidi Anderson
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  6. Ashley Howard
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  7. Sue Lynn Myhre
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI. 54702
  8. Jeffrey Janot (Corresponding Author)
    University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI 54702 Tel: 715-836-5333, Fax: 715-836-4074, Email: janotjm@uwec.edurn

Abstract

Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of TRX training when compared to traditional resistance training (RT). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine responses to TRX and RT on measures of strength, core endurance, flexibility, balance, and body composition. 

Methods: Fifty-four younger (aged 19-25) adults and middle-aged (aged 44-64) adults were randomised into a TRX (younger n=15; older n=8) or RT (younger n=14; middle-aged n= 7) program within their respective age group.  A control group was selected from additional participants (n=10) in the younger group.  Prior to and after completing the 7-week training program, the participants were evaluated for: height, weight, 5RM bench press for upper body (UB) strength, 5RM back squat for lower body (LB) strength, sit-and-reach test, abdominal skinfold (aSKF), waist girth, abdominal flexor test, back extensor test, side bridge left (SBL) and right (SBR) test, and Biodex fall risk balance test. 

Results: Within the young adult group, there were significant (p < .05) differences pre- to posttraining in abdominal flexor, back extensor, SBL and SBR, balance, flexibility, and LB strength following training for both the TRX and traditional groups. LB strength was improved more by RT (26.5% increase vs 13.1% for TRX) and TRX showed greater relative improvements in both abdominal flexor (80.5% vs 52.9%) and back extensor (31.1% vs 9.4%) endurance compared to RT. The other measures showed similar relative improvements across time. The middle-aged adult group showed significant (p < .05) improvements pre- to posttraining in back extensor, SBL and SBR, and LB strength following training for both the TRX and RT groups. Conclusions: Overall, the findings indicate that TRX training improves muscular fitness variables in both younger and middle-aged adults that are generally associated with RT. This could prove useful to individuals looking for more training options to gain both core endurance and muscular strength simultaneously and enhancing the diversity of exercise choices.

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© 2013, Australian Institute of Fitness


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Article Title

Effects of trx versus traditional resistance training programs on measures of muscular performance in adults

Journal Title

Journal of Fitness Research

Author Names

Jeffrey Janot
Taylor Heltne
Chelsea Welles
Jaime Riedl
Heidi Anderson
Ashley Howard
Sue Lynn Myhre
Jeffrey Janot (Corresponding Author)
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No citations available


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